The Short List: ABBY WHITE, INTERRACIAL RELATIONSHIP COUNSELOR

As part of the YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we feature Doan La’s comedy short film, ABBY WHITE, INTERRACIAL RELATIONSHIP COUNSELOR. We ask 5 questions to the director about the making of his film.

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

The Short List: VIA TEXT

As part of our new YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to director Abe Foreman-Greenwald about his short film VIA TEXT.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcxkrMWdXP0[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

Best Quality Clips

Lynn Chen is an actress who is attached to her computer. She has two blogs – The Actor’s Diet and Thick Dumpling Skin, both about – you guessed it – food. When she’s not writing for those sites she’s starring in films like “Surrogate Valentine,” “Saving Face,” “White on Rice,” “The People I’ve Slept With,” and the upcoming “Yes We’re Open.” Actors from “Better Luck Tomorrow” that she hasn’t worked with yet – Sung Kang, Jason Tobin, and Roger Fan.

I don’t think it should come as a surprise to anyone who grew up with me that I wound up becoming an actress who blogs about food. I’ve always been fascinated with seeing people eat on screen, so much so that I would save certain scenes to watch AS I consumed a meal. Rewind, salivate, play. Rewind, chew, play. Rewind, digest, play. I hate the term food porn, but that’s exactly what it was. My mother used to edit out the sex in movies I’d tape off of cable – there was no need – I wasn’t obsessed with those parts. Here’s some of my favorite drool-worthy scenes.

Joy Luck Club – Best Quality Crab

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjpgeCKL2hg

Never mind that this is the pivotal moment of the movie, where June finally connects with her mother. Give me that crab! I’ll take the worst quality one, gladly.

A Chinese New Year Food Odyssey (Part 2)

It’s been almost two weeks after Chinese New Year and believe it or not I am still working off the pounds that I put on. So you must understand why I have to split my food blog into two parts (read part 1 here). Just by thinking and writing about the food makes me feel bloated. Yes, I have an issue with food that stemmed from childhood. I was a fat kid and I ate a lot, quite unlike Miss Lynn Chen who was mistaken as an anorexic kid and would binge eat as a challenge:

Flashing back to the past Chinese New Year’s Eve, I left the family dinner with my dad to pick up my sister, my brother-in-law and my two nephews from Hong Kong. We went back to my dad’s place and of course they hadn’t eaten. My sister had brought a box of radish cakes, tarot cakes and New Year’s rice cakes fresh from Hong Kong and started pan-frying them in the kitchen:

INTERPRETATIONS Update 10-26: SDAFF Recap

So as our readers know, some of the YOMYOMF crew headed down south this past weekend for the San Diego Asian Film Fest where we announced the five winning finalists of our INTERPRETATIONS Film Initiative: Aldous Davidson, Kha Do, Keith Eng, Andrew Oh and Joey Yee.

The finalists were announced at the fest’s big gala dinner on Saturday night. Guest Offender David Henry Hwang (Tony Award-winning writer of M. Butterfly) and INTERPRETATIONS commissioned filmmaker Danny Pudi (Abed on NBC’s Community) presented awards to the three finalists in attendance: Aldous, Andrew and Joey (Keith and Kha will receive their awards by mail).

The Actor’s Diet

Ever wonder what actors eat to keep fit and trim?  While Roger & Sung have blogged about food with little mention of restrictions, it may be a lot different for female actors who are much more susceptible to the image that being like a toothpick is somehow supposed to be beautiful.  

I suppose many of us think actresses eat like this:

while some actresses proclaim they can pig out on anything they want, yet keep a svelte figure.  Unless there’s a whole lot of purging going on, the truth surely lies somewhere in between.   

I recently had an opportunity to meet with actress Lynn Chen who has starred in such films as THE PEOPLE I’VE SLEPT WITH, WHITE ON RICE and SAVING FACE, as well as numerous other film and television roles.  She maintains a blog post called the actor’s diet in which she posts daily on what she eats. 

She explains that many people have asked her questions about her diet, so this blog is partly to dispel the myths about what actors eat and also to explain some of the unique challenges that actors face that center around their bodies.  For instance, sometimes they need to tone up for an action movie or lose weight to look sick, all with little time to prepare.