The City of Angels by Night

Sometimes you have to make an effort to remind yourself of those unique and/or special things that might be right under your nose.

And one of those things for me is Griffith Observatory.

94090232.KgFOqz2S.Observatory_Sunset_Pano

Located atop Griffith Park with what is probably the best view of Los Angeles, the Observatory is only about two miles from where I live, but before this evening, I couldn’t remember the last time I had visited.

But tonight, I met a friend for dinner and afterwards, I wanted to take a short walk before heading home and that’s when I thought, “Damn, I haven’t been up to the Observatory in ages.”

When the Big One Hits!

Post-Loma Prieta earthquake. Santa Cruz, 1989.

Post-Loma Prieta earthquake. Santa Cruz, 1989.

Yes, there was an earthquake in Los Angeles this morning, thus ending what has come to be known as our long “earthquake drought.” Typically, a quake of magnitude 4.4 (which today’s was) should happen every year in the L.A. basin, but we’ve been spared that in recent years. According to scientists, that may soon change with quakes coming with more regularity, but that’s a different story.

This drought may partially explain today’s post-earthquake freak-out that happened on social media. By some of the twitter and facebook reactions I’ve been seeing, you’d think the big one had hit us. Have we become that wimpy unaccustomed to a little shaking that a mere 4.4 is met with such fear and surprise? Come on, we’re Angelenos, this is just another inconvenience to shrug off before returning to sleep (or whatever else you were doing at 6:30AM).

L.A. Rainpocalypse & Pho

Yes, it’s raining and raining hard here in L.A. and as we’re in the midst of this bad drought, any sort of wetness is welcome.

rain

But you know what—all those stereotypes of Angelenos and rain are pretty much true. Everything from how we can’t drive in the rain (yes, I saw at least three accidents coming into the YOMYOMF office) to how even a little bit of rain leads to major freak-outs:

Around the Horn: Buying a Home

My fiancé and I went house hunting last year.  We considered bidding on a few places, but the mortgage amounts seemed too high for our budget.  Two weeks ago, we resumed the search and found that home prices had risen 26% since we’d last looked (oops).

I’m curious about your thoughts on home or condo ownership.  If you own a place, how do you feel about it – financially, emotionally, etc.?  If you don’t own, would you like to?  On one of our early dates, Michael mentioned that he’d always looked forward to living in his own house.  I replied that the idea of home ownership made me feel trapped.

(but I wouldn’t feel trapped in here:)

The Short List: BASKETBALL, MERI JAAN

As part of the YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to director Veena Hampapur about her short film, BASKETBALL, MERI JAAN.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WkvWGdgGpQ[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

Original Offender: David Tran, Inventor of Sriracha

The LA Times has a great profile on David Tran, a Vietnamese refugee who epitomizes the American dream and became a multi-millionaire, thanks to his need to fill the void of a good hot sauce to add to his food in his new adopted U.S. homeland after escaping Vietnam on a Taiwanese freighter after the fall of Saigon. Setting up a company called Huy Fong Foods, named after said Taiwanese freighter, his homemade concoction took off in San Gabriel Valley (east LA) and he would make deliveries to supermarkets and restaurants.

Tweet to Win Free Ticks to Our YouTube Adaptation of ‘Yellow Face’ at LAAPFF

Regular readers of this blog already know that the YOMYOMF Network is producing the first-ever play to YouTube adaptation of a major theatrical work—our fellow Offender David Henry Hwang’s Yellow Face.

David is a Tony Award-winning writer (for M. Butterfly) and Yellow Face brought him a prestigious Obie Award and was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The play follows an Asian American playwright, conveniently named DHH (Ryun Yu), who casts Marcus (Covert Affairs’ Christopher Gorham), a Caucasian actor, in his new show mistakenly believing that Marcus is part Asian and tries to cover up his mistake once he learns the truth.

Our friends at Visual Communications will be hosting a work-in-progress screening of Yellow Face during this year’s Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival on Sunday, May 5 at 5PM. The screening will be introduced by YouTube’s Bing Chen and will be followed by a discussion with YOMYOMF Creative Director Philip W. Chung, director Jeff Liu and cast members Ryun Yu, Linda Park and Sab Shimono. If you want to be the first to get a sneak peek of this unique project before it’s released on YouTube in late May, purchase tickets here before they’re all gone. You can also enter for a chance to win a FREE pair of tickets from YOMYOMF by simply sending us a tweet. Here’s what you need to do:

The Short List: VIA TEXT

As part of our new YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to director Abe Foreman-Greenwald about his short film VIA TEXT.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcxkrMWdXP0[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

The Short List: THE CHRISTMAS SPECIAL

As part of our new YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we feature a holiday-themed short film from one of our own, Offender Alfredo Botello (who is also the writer-director of the YOMYOMF web series REALITY REBOOT starring Chester See). Below are 5 questions we asked him about the making of this short film.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbaHOa_3f2M&feature=share&list=PL271F68EF73F6EA1A[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

The Short List: THIS WILL ALL MAKE PERFECT SENSE SOMEDAY

As part of our new YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to director Long-Cuu Phan, regarding the making of his short film, THIS WILL ALL MAKE PERFECT SENSE SOMEDAY.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a–8ZTGNhTY[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

I read 100% women, the Haruki Murakami story which the film is based on, my freshman year in college and it changed my life. I loved it and was determined to make the story into a film the first chance I got. The idea to use stop motion for the montage sequence was foremost a practical decision. It would have been impossible to shoot it on film for logistical and financial reasons. Artistically, the use of photos to represent the past was almost a given.

The Lakers’ Coaching Carousel – A Lesson in Leverage

If you’re a hoopshead like I – and several other family members on this site – am/are, then all you’ve been hearing about today is the Lakers’ decision to go with Mike D’Antoni over Phil Jackson to fill the coaching vacancy created by the firing of Mike Brown. But what gets me every time one of these things happens is all the impassioned conjecture and confusion over why things happened the way they did. In this case, it’s stuff like: why did the Lakers pull the trigger on D’Antoni Sunday night before Phil Jackson’s agent had a chance to start negotiations on Monday? Wasn’t this Phil’s “job to lose”? Who was whispering in Jim Buss’s ear and swaying him away from Phil?

Without needing to know the exact details of what happened or who said what (or debating over whether D’Antoni was the right fit), all this can be understood very simply if you just boil it down to one simple thing: leverage. People tend to let emotion get in the way when it comes to trying to understand these dealings, but it’s really quite common in business, and would make everything a lot more easier to accept if people just tried to see exactly where the leverage is in each situation. My family members Justin and Norith always label me as a “company man” when I go into these soliloquys, but it’s really not about choosing sides so much as it is just trying to understand the situation and why things unfold the way they do.

The Short List: 9:30

As part of our new YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to Mun Chee Yong, the director of 9:30.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FHBkqrqOWc[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?