Watch Dave Boyle’s MAN FROM RENO opening this weekend

10533982_10155361625195158_4852046159908324785_nWith a headline that says “A Director who’s showing how easy it is to cast Asian actors” those are some fighting words! But, multicultural casting has been film director Dave Boyle’s M.O. who fell into Japanese culture when at the age of 19, this young Mormon was designated to go on his mission in Australia and preach the gospel to a close-knit overseas Japanese community. All of his films, five in total, feature some aspect of Japanese culture, via Japanese American characters who inhibit the same idiosyncratic and DIY traits that Boyle IRL inhabit. From his debut BIG DREAMS, LITTLE TOKYO to SURROGATE VALENTINE and DAYLIGHT SAVINGS, parts one and two of his DON’T LOOK BACK inspired films about lovable sad sack, indie musician Goh Nakamura, they’re all iterations of Boyle.

“Goodbye, Saturday Morning” is the next big ’80s nostalgia anthem that your friends will hear in 2017


Why, 2017? Because that’s the year the final season of PARKS AND RECREATION takes place in. But, there’s truth to this headline because, hopefully, SF-based DIY and uber-talented multi-hyphenate H.P. Mendoza’s 8-bit animation musical feature DORK will be done and one of its main songs, “Goodbye, Saturday Morning” will be on the front page of The Daily Beast or some other mainstream media website, thinking they’ve got the scoop on the next big viral hit. But screw them, because we’re telling you to listen to it now!

Mr Chicago – Tim Hugh of the Asian American Showcase

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In 1995, the Asian American music scene was a tiny spark that kindled a film festival. It was all happening at the same time. A tour and CD that seemed epic, “Ear of the Dragon,” went across America. It even stopped in my city, LA, and one of the key bands was Seam. A couple of the members, Sooyoung Park, William Shin and their friend, Ben Kim, began a small film festival in Chicago.

My history with this festival begins in 1998 with Sunsets, a project I co-directed with my cousin Michael Aki (Idemoto). It was part of a whirlwind of 4 feature films directed by Asian Americans. At the time, it was a record and it was dubbed “The Asian American New Wave.” It was a bullshit title, but we went with it. One of the stops was Chicago’s “Asian American Showcase.”

Reinventing Asian American Cinema

(Not so much The Joy Luck Club from left to right: Amy Hill, Kimberly Rose-Wolter, Michelle Krusiec, Tamlyn Tomita, Julia Nickson, Akemi Look, Elizabeth Sung and Karin Anna Cheung)

(Not so much The Joy Luck Club from left to right: Amy Hill, Kimberly Rose-Wolter, Michelle Krusiec, Tamlyn Tomita, Julia Nickson, Akemi Look, Elizabeth Sung and Karin Anna Cheung)

If there is a cinematic genre called Asian American film, then every Asian American feature should be an invention until we find a formula that can do well and sustain the genre. If we don’t have a formula, every movie must be a new invention or a re-invention. That’s the real excitement about Asian American cinema; precisely because there is no formula for success every movie can essentially be experimental and innovative.

I keep thinking that the last feature I made would be my last Asian American feature, but then there are so many wonderful Asian American actors I want to work with and so many new ideas I want to try out.

The Short List: BASKETBALL, MERI JAAN

As part of the YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to director Veena Hampapur about her short film, BASKETBALL, MERI JAAN.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WkvWGdgGpQ[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

The Short List: TERRA COTTA

As part of the YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to director Yasmine Gomez about her short film, TERRA COTTA.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyWz4wSQQxU[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?

The Short List: VIA TEXT

As part of our new YOMYOMF Network series, The Short List, where we present short films we love every Friday at Noon EST, we’ve reached out to the filmmakers with 5 Questions to see what’s up since the production of their short film. It’s a way for them to revisit their film and get an update on their next projects. You can view all The Short List films here.

This week, we ask 5 questions to director Abe Foreman-Greenwald about his short film VIA TEXT.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcxkrMWdXP0[/youtube]

1. How did you come up with the concept for this short?